Steven Pressfield – Writing Quote Wednesday

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Writing quote created by Paul Jenny from Flickr photo “Black Marble” by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Don’t cheat us of your contribution! Leave a link in the comments section to your latest gift to the world and every being in it. Stories truly are the wildest things.

If you need a writing prompt to get you started, click through to my WRITING PROMPTS here.

You can find more of Steven Pressfield at his website: http://www.stevenpressfield.com/

Flickr photo by NASA (CC License)

Philip Pullman – Writing Quote Wednesday

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Writing Quote created by Paul Jenny with Flickr photo by Joseph Voves

I like to say we human beings live in story like fish live in water. Take fish out of water and they can’t live, they flop around gasping for breath wondering, “What happened?”

The same is true for us. We ask the same question, over and over again, every day of our lives.

“What happened?”

When we don’t answer that question we feel just like those poor fish.

When we experience anything, major or minor, we tell a story to relate it to those we care about (or to anyone who will listen). We want to share our experience with others and let them know, “This is how it is for me.”

I’m grateful that I get to do that every day as part of my human being-ness. I chose Mr. Pullman’s quote today because it puts the importance of story right up there with shelter, nourishment and companionship.

Please leave a comment about something that happened to you recently that made a big difference in your life. I’d love to hear about it.

Stories are the Wildest Things.

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Watch Philip Pullman doing an Open University lecture about his writing on YouTube.com

Flickr photo by Joseph Voves (CC License)

Harlan Coben – Writing Quote Wednesday

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Writing Quote created by Paul Jenny with Flickr photo “Kali Sweats it Out” by Abhisek Sarda

This gorgeous photo by Abhisek Sarda perfectly embodies this quote by Harlan Coben and how I feel right now working on the first draft of my MG adventure novel.

Kali is the Goddess of Time, Change and Destruction, and I feel like she is always close at hand any time we begin a creative act.

I sit down at the keyboard, inspired, ready to get more words on the page. As time passes, I begin to sweat because the story I have in my mind isn’t flowing as easily onto the page. With mounting desperation, I wrestle with my characters as they threaten to change and destroy the original idea of where the story is going.

But the beauty of Kali and the wisdom she imparts is that she is the “ultimate reality” and her change is inevitable. Like a devotee of Kali, I have to give in time and change and destruction. Resistance is futile. She is a goddess and she demands our full attention with her three eyes, four hands, skirt of human hands and necklace of skulls.

So do our stories, for they are the wildest things.

“O Mother, even a dullard becomes a poet who meditates upon thee raimented with space, three-eyed, creatrix of the three worlds, whose waist is beautiful with a girdle made of numbers of dead men’s arms…” (From a Karpuradistotra hymn, translated from Sanskrit by Sir John Woodroffe)

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Watch Harlan Coben talk about his early writing on RT Book Reviews on YouTube.com

 

Sylvia Plath – Writing Quote Wednesday

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Ah, Sylvia, the brute, brute heart of a brute like you.

The self-doubt you spoke of creeps in and sits inside my bones.

Help me to have the “outgoing guts” to write about everything in life and to have the imagination to improvise.

I want to split my life open like a ripe juicy watermelon and watch the pink juice and black seeds run together.

I want to sit in the cornucopia of life’s left ear, out of the wind, counting the stars of all colors, not just the plum and the red.

Help me today, and on all dark days, to unclench the owl’s talons from my heart

so that even among the fiercest flames

I can write about – everything.

 

Anne Lamott – Writing Quote Wednesday

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“Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation.

They deepen and widen and expand our sense of life: they feed the soul. When writers make us shake our heads with the exactness of their prose and their truths, and even make us laugh about ourselves or life, our buoyancy is restored.

We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again. It’s like singing on a boat during a terrible storm at sea.

You can’t stop the raging storm, but singing can change the hearts and spirits of the people who are together on that ship.”

                                                                                                                                           – Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird