Writer Dad by Sean Platt

All participants in Fiction Unboxed with the guys at Self Publishing Podcast got a free copy of Writer Dad by Sean Platt. I started reading it on my phone as soon as I was able to download it and finished it in one sitting (with a few minor breaks for coffee, tousling my four-year-old’s hair, nodding to my wife and cooking some food).

It’s a moving story and one that will be familiar to any writer parent. Sean talks about his struggles with school, money, relationships, parenting and trying to break through as a writer. It’s a very personal book and Sean wasn’t even sure he was going to publish it because it felt too private, but in the end his wife, Cindy, and those who read it encouraged him to put it out there in the world.

I’m glad he did.

As a writer dad myself, struggling with many of the same issues, Sean’s book inspired me to keep going, to keep writing, to keep discovering what my journey will be.

Writer Dad is a romantic love story, an adventure in possibility and an inspirational book for all the “writer parents” out there. Buy it and read it, you’ll be glad you did. Click on the cover below to get your copy now.

ImagePlease leave me a comment about your experience as a Writer Dad or Mom. I’d love to hear your story.

Writing Prompt 02: Retro Jet Pack Flyers

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A retro illustration of people flying with jet packs.

  • Who are they (do they work for the good guys or the bad guys)?
  • What do they want?
  • Why are they flying around like that?
  • What gets in their way?

Send me a link to your stories. I’d love to read them!

Write a Novel in 30 Days – FICTION UNBOXED

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Fiction Unboxed, from the guys at Self-Publishing Podcast, has started and it’s very exciting to participate in this “never-been-done-before” online event. I put that in quotes because I think that most everything has been done before, but that brilliance comes when people combine things that have been done before in new ways. This is a great new combination that is generating a lot of creative energy and excitement in the self-publishing world.

Over the next 30 days the guys are opening up their writing process to those who invested in the project on Kickstarter. I kicked in at a higher level than I normally have for other projects because the guys are funny, dedicated storytellers that believe we can change the world with a story.

As usual, the guys are giddy and unfocused at first, but after a short segment of rambling they get down to the nitty-gritty of world building for this 30 day book. If you know their podcasts, Self Publishing Podcast and Better Off Undead, this style of working will be familiar to you. If you are just coming is as a supporter of the project, it might be a little distracting at first. Hang in there, though, because what happens is a fun and truthful way of approaching story building.

The world they are describing sounds really fascinating and watching the guys “spit ball” and toss ideas around is enlightening. They bring up their favorite movies, books and television tropes to create their new world. As they describe their ideas, they go off on side tangents, double back on themselves, joke around and as Dave says, “It’s an awesome thing.”

It’s like a question and answer session with their own imaginations and each of the guys contribute in different ways. Sean has logorrhea and is the cheerleader. He drives the conversations forward and wrangles the random tangents and ideas into some kind of cohesive whole. Johnny B. Truant is the calculating mind, adding and subtracting the value of each idea and how he can use it to get the first draft on the page. Dave is the dark and stormy naysayer who quietly drives the story into the shadows so that Sean and Johnny can steer it back into the light.

I think it’s extremely helpful to see them work in this way. My takeaway (to use a business term) is that you have to pump out a LOT of ideas and then ask yourself questions about how these ideas will work when you begin telling the story within the world.

If you haven’t been listening to the Self-Publishing Podcast, check them out. As Sean says, “You can tackle any creative idea if your how and your why are good enough…it’s stupid and/or impossible but we believe anyway.”

This blog, my current MG paranormal adventure novel, and several other projects I’m working on now are because of these guys and their inspiration (and the ongoing encouragement of my four-year-old and lovely wife).

Thanks guys!

I’m looking forward to seeing where their process takes them and, as a result, takes me as well.

I’ll be posting about Fiction Unboxed and my experiences for the next 30 days as well. Please follow and like the blog to keep updated.

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10 Things to Learn about Writing from Swiss artists Fischli and Weiss

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from Cléo Charuet´s studio wall and / or Peter Fischli & David Weiss

I found this photo on a great blog on redbubble.com and think it is really has a lot to teach us about writing. Peter and David are fine artists, but I’ve thought a lot about these concepts and how they apply to me and my writing work.

1. By working on only one project at a time, I find I am less distracted and better able to get quality work done. Putting down one word right after the other will get me to the end. Sitting at my desk thinking of all the projects I haven’t done gets me nowhere. We are not as great at multi-tasking as we think.

2. What is the problem your MC is trying to solve? Is your character just telling us their thoughts and feelings or are they doing something to solve a problem? A great fix for writing that doesn’t move your audience in any way. Check out this funny post by Ash Ambirge of The Middle Finger Project about The Secret to Creating the Elusive Emotional Connection in Writing.

3. Instead of listening, try to be a listening for possibility in your life. I try to be a listening for what it is I want to accomplish with my writing as well. By being a listening for something very specific, it will often show up unexpectedly. I also like to make my computer read my works in progress. Even though it sounds like Stephen Hawking is reading my words back to me, I still get a sense of rhythm and timing and whether I’m repeating certain phrases or using confusing language. It also makes me laugh when the computer pronounces things in a completely inappropriate way. The Listening Project is an interesting documentary that asks the question, “What does the world think about America?”

4. A lot of my writing time is spent asking questions. What does my MC want? Why do they want that? What are they going to do to get it? What obstacles are in the way? What tactics are they using to try to get what they want? Also, “Is my coffee mug full?” If it isn’t, time to take a break and refill it.

5. I always wait until polishing for this one. I try to turn off that inner voice that keeps saying, “This is nonsense” over and over, endlessly repeating itself in my head like my four-year-old when he wants a piece of candy that I’ve said he can’t have. Just let everything out in the first draft and then go back and find the sense in the nonsense.

6. Change is inevitable. I’m a plotter. I like a to have my beats worked out before I start. I often find the story changing as I work on it. The characters will say or do something that takes the story in an awesome direction but veers from the original idea. I try to let this play itself out and not worry about it too much. I try to trust that my brain has worked on the problems of the story while I’ve been doing laundry, taking a shower, trying to get the four-year-old down for a nap. I hope I never get too rigid not to embrace change, because every time I have, I’ve had an amazing adventure because of it.

7. Sometimes, I write for several hours and realize that what I’ve spent all that time on won’t make it into the final draft. But I know that these “mistakes” are important to get to the next level of writing that I have to do. I often teach my students that mistakes are an important part of the process. We are all human. We do not know exactly how to do things perfectly every time. If it was easy, it wouldn’t be as fun to do. Make mistakes, admit them, and move on. “Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one’s mistakes.”
― Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray from Goodreads.com

8. Say it simple. Going back through first drafts I search for where I’m trying too hard. Having an editor or a beta reader can be really useful for this.

9. Breathe. Everyone, at some point, feels exactly as you do now as you are trying to write. Know this and be calm. Keep putting one word after the other. Get to the end. Read this great article on How Succesful People Stay Calm on Forbes.com.

10. If you aren’t enjoying what you are doing, neither will your readers. Smile, even in the midst of the difficulties, knowing that you are doing something that other people only dream about doing.There is even some research to suggest that the physical act of smiling, even if you don’t feel happy, can lead to feelings of happiness. Try it!

Close Encounters with Famous Writers – Maya Angelou

I met Maya Angelou once at a dinner theatre in Delaware of all places. She was doing a reading and I was trying to recruit her for a small film project I was working on. She graciously took a moment to talk to me about the project but let me know in no uncertain terms that she was way too busy to get involved. I didn’t care, though. It was nice to have met her in person and to have made a small connection with a brilliant and beautiful mind. She was a “phenomenal woman.” Her light has gone out, but her words shine on.

Unboxing Fiction Unboxed

I’m supporting the guys at Self Publishing Podcast in their Fiction Unboxed project (under a pseudonym) on Kickstarter. For a small donation you get to watch them write a novel, live, in 30 days. I think it’s going to be a lot of fun and bring up some interesting issues.

I’m going to comment on the process of following Fiction Unboxed and how I use what I learn to complete my #WIP.